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L2A Links for March 25th

  • Gary Hamel on Managing Generation Y – the Facebook Generation – Gary Hamel’s Management 2.0 – WSJ – Gary provides a great summary of how organizations and leaders will have to function differently once the "Facebook generation" is in power. I especially like #11: Intrinsic rewards matter most. Extrinsic rewards (read bonu$e$) are having a success backlash and may actually undermine performance and job satisfaction. Traditional organization structure and function is in for some radical changes.
  • Government Agencies Make Friends With New Media | Epicenter from Wired.com – A very important legal hurdle has been crossed to free Federal agencies to start leveraging the power of social media. This will be a wonderful boon in fed's ability to share learning and information.
  • Crowdsourcing Examples – Anjali Ramachandran, a strategist at London based digital agency Many by Many, has compiled a very useful list of 135 real-world examples of businesses leveraging crowd contributions online.

Posted in: Jeff's Bookmarks

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L2A Links for March 1st

  • Progressing Through Change – Introduction – Great (if I do say so myself) online tool you can use for free to see how you or your team are progressing through the changes your organization is facing. Chock full of tips to help you or your team work through change successfully.
  • The Unsociable, Radically-Individualist Soul of Social Media – Another thoughtful (and lengthy – I wish I could commit to typing like Venk does!) post from Venkatesh Rao explores the psychology of people who are successful in "social" media.

Posted in: Jeff's Bookmarks

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Learn to Adapt Links for November 21st through November 25th

  • Get Rid of the Performance Review! – WSJ.com – Samuel Culbert posts an argument against the common practice of performance reviews. This echos a sentiment that I have long held. Reviews really only serve bureaucracy and passive-aggressive accountability. High performers don't need them and low performers should be dealt with immediately through a PIP (instead of passing the confrontational buck to the end of the year). Let's improve performance by managing it instead of reviewing it!
  • The Future of Online Learning: Ten Years On – Stephen Downes provides a vast overview of the state of education (it covers more than just online) by revisiting his essay of ten years ago.

Posted in: Jeff's Bookmarks

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Learn to Adapt Links for October 15th through October 23rd

  • Social Media Classroom – The Social Media Classroom (we’ll call it SMC) includes a free and open-source (Drupal-based) web service that provides teachers and learners with an integrated set of social media that each course can use for its own purposes—integrated forum, blog, comment, wiki, chat, social bookmarking, RSS, microblogging, widgets , and video commenting are the first set of tools. The Classroom also includes curricular material: syllabi, lesson plans, resource repositories, screencasts and videos.
  • Productivity 2.0: How the New Rules of Work Are Changing the Game | Zen Habits – Interesting post from Leo Babauta of Zen Habits. Despite the grating "Productivity 2.0" moniker, he raises some very good points about how technology empowers individual performance. Some of the ideas will be difficult inside incumbent organizations, but they do approach ideal performance. His "Just Start" echoes my long standing mantra of "Just Do It" (props to Nike) and I echo his "Don't multi-task" in my other mantra "Muli-tasking Kills". He also touches on the well established them of moving from hierarchy to wirearchy.

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Learn to Adapt Links for May 24th

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Learn to Adapt bookmarks for March 10th

These are my links for March 10th:

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Learn to Adapt bookmarks for March 4th

These are my links for March 4th:

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Presidential Candidate Leadership Experience Scorecard

At dinner last night with friends, we discussed politics and many agreed that Barack Obama did not have enough leadership experience to prepare him for POTUS. So, I decided to do a quick scorecard of “leadership experience” of all the candidates. I decided after throwing it together to post it here.
First some disclaimers: This scorecard is entirely arbitrary, quick, and dirty. It is also really a scorecard of leadership/political/management experience instead of a true analysis of “leadership”. The list of qualities of “leadership” is lengthy and arguable, and I will leave that argument to the thousands of books already written on the topic. Finally, as shown below, the scorecard is simply a quickly-assembled list of 11 roles/experiences that might prepare a candidate to be successful as POTUS. The 11 are:

  • VP
  • State Governor
  • Cabinet (heading any large federal government agency)
  • US Senate
  • US House of Representatives
  • State elected official
  • Local elected official
  • Military officer
  • CEO (or any managing executive role in a large company)
  • MBA
  • Political Science, Foreign Relations, or Public Admin degree

And then I checked Wikipedia to complete the scorecard for the three remaining candidates for POTUS (Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, and John McCain). For contrast, I included the previous four POTUSs (POTUSi?) as well. The results:

  H Clinton Obama McCain W Bush B Clinton H Bush Reagan
VP           X  
Governor       X X   X
Cabinet           X  
Senate X X X        
H of R     X     X  
State   X     X    
Local              
Military     X X   X X
CEO       X   X  
MBA       X      
PoliSci X X     X    
Total: 2 3 3 4 3 5 2

 

But, obviously, all these things are not equal. So I decided to weight the 11 categories like this: VP: 5, Governor: 4, Cabinet: 3, Senate and H of R: 2, every thing else gets a 1. I also spotted a few points for Hillary’s First Lady (3 points under VP) and gave Reagan a CEO point for his presidency of SAG. With that weighted scale, the leadership experience scorecard winners are:

  H Clinton Obama McCain W Bush B Clinton H Bush Reagan
VP (3)         5  
Governor       4 4   4
Cabinet           3  
Senate 2 2 2        
H of R     2     2  
State   1     1    
Local              
Military     1 1   1 1
CEO       1   1 1
MBA       1      
PoliSci 1 1     1    
Total: 6 4 5 7 6 12 6

 

So, if we are to judge how successful a candidate will be as POTUS based on their “leadership” experience, the best of the bunch would be both of the Bush boys. And the recent favorites from both parties (Bill Clinton and Ronald Reagan) only score a 6 – half of the total for the clear winner, Bush the First. As for our current three candidates, it is a close race. The three points spotted to Hillary for for First Lady put’s her on top of McCain by one point.
Now, to wrap things up, I will spot one last set of (completely arbitrary) points. I start with the assumption that every day you are alive you gain wisdom that makes you a better leader. So, for every year in age, I will give each candidate one-tenth of a point. Hillary gets 6, Obama gets 4.5, and McCain gets 7.1. The final tally this increasingly arbitrary scorecard of leadership experience:

  • John McCain: 12.1
  • Hillary Clinton: 12.0
  • Barack Obama: 8.5

So, when you do this (admittedly arbitrary) math, Obama is considerably less experienced for the job (30% less so than Hillary or McCain).
Now we just need to decide if leadership experience is what we need most in a POTUS now…

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